Tes - The education podcast The Tes podcast brings you all the latest news, reviews and opinion from the world of education

“Being autistic is not necessarily disabling,” explains Dr Luke Beardon. “Instead, it is a disadvantage. And is that disadvantage a result of being autistic, or is it a result of being in a certain environment?”

Dr Beardon is certain it is the latter. He is a senior lecturer working within The Autism Centre at Sheffield Hallam University and on this week’s Podagogy podcast he explains why he believes autistic children have an unnecessarily challenging time in school.

“Being a teacher and having that level of expectation to engage with the autistic community without really good solid levels of support is massively unfair on the teacher, the child and the family,” he explains. “But there is no doubt we are failing these kids.”

He discusses how we combat this. He offers three golden rules to support autistic students and offers a huge amount of advice to teachers on everything from pastoral care to academic support to behaviour. 

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“You can shout as often as you like that ‘x’ should work, but if it is not working while I am teaching, I will do other things that on paper might not be as efficient,” says Dr Christian Bokhove, a lecturer in mathematics education at the University of Southampton and a specialist in research methodologies.

Speaking on this episode of Tes Podagogy, which focuses on spotting research myths and how teachers can be empowered by research, Bokhove explains that the relationship between teachers and education research is a difficult one to get right. On one side, it has huge scope to improve practice; on the other, there are real dangers in how teachers often consume research.

Bokhove – a former teacher - identifies some prime examples of where he feels research has been oversimplified or misconstrued by educators, including popular work from the likes of ED Hirsch and John Sweller. He also details things teachers should look for in research and discusses issues such as publication bias.

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Anders Ericsson, professor of Psychology at Florida State University and the academic behind deliberate practice theory, discusses his expertise research and how to ensure students work at their peak performance.

NOTE: there is some slight clipping of the sound on this podcast due to a technical issue due to the international phone line, it should hopefully not spoil your enjoyment of the interview 

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Uta Frith is one of the world's leading experts on autism and emeritus professor of cognitive development at UCL. In this episode, she talks about damaging stereotypes and myths that surround autism and how teachers are crucial to the devlopment of children with autism. She also talks about the best ways for teachers to assist autistic students. 

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Carol Dweck, Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor of Psychology at Stanford University and the woman behind Growth Mindset theory, explains how her theory has been misinterpreted, what she has to say to her critics and her efforts to create a growth mindset pedagogy

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Professors Robert and Elizabeth Bjork are among the world's leading researchers into memory and learning. For this podcast, they discuss what teachers need to know about memory and explain how group work, tailoring content to student interests and testing are key to helping students retain knowledge. 

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In the second episode of Tes Podagogy - the Tes podcast all about teaching and learning – Dylan Wiliam, emeritus professor of assessment at UCL Institute of Education author of books including Inside the Black Box, talks about the complex relationship between education research and classroom practice and ruminats upon everything from Dweck's Mindset theory to John Sweller's Cogntiive Load Theory. 

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March 24, 2015  

Join the TES' very own Sarah Simons as she talks to the 157 Group's Lynne Sedgmore about reflections and spirituality, Charlotte Forshaw from Wigan and Leigh College about being a new teacher in FE and, finally, Sue Crowley, chair of the Institute for Learning about CPD.

 

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